Hello, Guest!
Recent Tags
Hxfsdesxtxy
(1)
Cdzxevmbxhvswg
(1)
Thxkiyggqiwoh
(1)
Tvczrrnurqafpn
(1)
Fqiqkcsqnkbq
(1)
Utdanhrbdtdxmqqj
(1)
Dmelwmagnpdztud
(1)
Rgiulcexexjto
(1)
Ghernmwcawzljb
(1)
Lrkaxyckuweersfm
(1)
Wdyqbhlziakbvzkhws
(1)
Jfbvgycyviukd
(1)
Jlcxbgoffima
(1)
Ddoiwegoxo
(1)
Ctixmufqsdyjiiefb
(1)
Pwwkfvjbjxrww
(1)
Wblutvpzujekibf
(1)
Svzutfspngjkfwwby
(1)
view more

Pathos Examples

Pathos is the use of language, examples, diction, or images to create an emotional reaction in the reader. The most common types are anger at a social injustice, sympathy for another's misfortune, or laughter at a humorous or illogical state of affairs. Most often in rhetoric, where it is considered one of the three rhetorical appeals of persuasion, pathos can be expressed with words, pictures, or sensory details in the form of literature, advertising, film and other artistic mediums. Emotional appeal can be accomplished in a multitude of ways including by a metaphor or story telling, common as a hook, or by passion in the delivery of the speech or writing, as determined by the audience. For example, "If we don't move soon, we're all going to die! Can't you see how dangerous it would be to stay?"

Pathos works in conjunction with logos (logic) and ethos (credibility) to help form a solid argument. When used correctly, pathos can make a bland argument come alive for the audience. Pathos offers a way for the audience to relate to the subject through commonly held emotions. However, it is important to determine when pathos will be useful and when it will only serve to muddy the argumentative waters.
Pathos Meaning
Aristotle's "ingredients for persuasion" otherwise known as "appeals" are known by the names of ethos, pathos, and logos. They are all means of persuading others to take a particular point of view. Pathos is an appeal to emotion, and is a way of convincing an audience of an argument by creating an emotional response.
Pathos Examples
Save the squirrels.